Pozole (Take 2)

Three years later, I am finally updating and sharing a second, more improved pozole recipe. Click here to read Pozole (Take 1). It’s not that I’ve spent all that time trying to perfect it, I just hadn’t revisited making pozole until this year. I sort of forgot about it until some local spots reminded and inspired me to make it again.

My annual El Paso food year in review will soon be published, but until then, here’s a recipe and trend watch report in case you don’t want to go through the trouble of making it yourself. In 2014, El Pasoans were treated to three vegetarian versions of menudo/pozole (the difference is explained in Pozole (Take 1)).

  • Joe, Vinny, & Bronson’s Bohemian Cafe

Both meat & vegan menudo is featured every Sunday. This place has a lot of other veg-friendly menu items; make it a 2015 resolution to try it out. I liked this menudo a lot, but found it a little salty for my taste and wanted more hominy. I liked their use of thinly sliced tofu as a stand-in for the tripe. For $5, you get a good-sized bowl with bread.

Veggie Menudo @ JVB with tofu. The bread looks pale because they had run out of butter that day.
Veggie Menudo @ JVB with tofu. The bread looks pale because they ran out of butter that day.
  • The Mustard Seed Cafe

This was one of my favorite places of 2014. You can’t beat delicious, healthy, AND affordable vegetarian food that supports a great cause (they also have meat options). I love that El Paso now has 2 non-profit eateries (Cafe Mayapan is the other). The downside? Very limited hours of operation (Wed-Fri, 11am-2pm). Also, the menu changes every week, which is fun, but a shame if you missed something like pozole, featured only twice this year. The suggested price (it’s pay-what-you-can) was $2 for a cup and $4 for a bowl that came with all the fixins, and you got to choose between green or red, meat or vegan. I decided on red, and it was very good, although it was more like a stew to me, since it was loaded with veggies.

*Update (10/5/17): Chef Roman is no longer at Mustard Seed, so it is highly unlikely this dish will return. Also, it is no longer as veg-friendly as it once was.

Red pozole @ The Mustard Seed Cafe
Red pozole @ The Mustard Seed Cafe
Also on the menu was garlicky bread from Belle Sucre, corn & black bean salad, & lime pepita cookies (vegan & baked in-house!)
Also on the menu was GARLICKY bread from Belle Sucre, corn & black bean salad, & lime pepita cookies (vegan & baked in-house!). The bread was delicious, but boy, did I have dragon breath for like days.
  • Eloise

This month, Eloise released a new winter menu that debuted newcomer, Menudont. It’s a large bowl of of hominy and seitanic tripe (seitan is “wheat meat” or meat sub made of vital wheat gluten for you nubes). I have yet to try this one, because it is a whopping $13. I’m sure it’s worth it, as it’s a really big bowl and they make the seitan in-house.

*Update (10/5/17): I’ve tried it and it’s delicious and hearty, although I haven’t had it since last year. Also, prices have changed! You can order a small bowl for $8 or a large bowl for $12. Best of all, it’s available every day!

Menudont with seitan at Eloise. Available every morning!

 

The Recipe: Vegan Menudo/Pozole

pozole take 2
Pozole @ La Casa de Lisa

Tips & Ideas:

  • Meat stand-ins: I never liked the meat in there to begin with, so I don’t add any subs in my recipe. If you really want added texture & protein, try seitan, tofu (maybe frozen & then thawed for a chewier texture), tofu skin (dried bean curd sticks), textured vegetable protein, or shitake mushrooms. My Instagram friend @undeadben1 says he takes sliced tofu and fries it in vegan butter until it’s a little crispy, which adds texture and richness.
  • Chile: I can’t find the dried chile pellets at the farmers market anymore and I’m too lazy to make it from scratch. Bueno brand is my favorite and can be found in the freezer section of most grocery stores. It has no added seasonings. I like using the Special Reserve Premium Red Chile Puree. If you’re going to make your own, all you have to do is remove the stems and seeds from about 4 dried red chiles (guajillo, cascabel, or ancho are the most common used for menudo), submerge them in hot water for about 30 minutes, and blend the chiles, adding enough of the soaking liquid until you get a smooth sauce. Strain it if you don’t want it all cascarudo (as in a bunch of chile skins floating around).
  • Broth: In my opinion, the brand of Edward & Sons Not-Beef boullion cubes are what make my pho and pozole really good.
  • Hominy/Posole: Use canned if you must, but there’s nothing like a slow-simmered soup. The nixtamal is raw and needs to cook for about 2-3 hours, and that’s also what’s going to give you a more authentic broth. Seriously, don’t use canned hominy. Frozen nixtamal is easily found in El Paso grocery stores in the freezer aisle, usually next to the chile or Hispanic products.

This recipe makes a whole pot or about 6 2-cup servings, but you can double it if you’re making it for a big crowd.

8 cups water
4 cups faux beef or vegetable stock (I use 2 Edward & Sons Not-Beef bouillon cubes)
1/2 package (1 lb.) frozen nixtamal (uncooked hominy)
1 14 oz. container of red chile sauce, thawed if frozen
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 teaspoon garlic powder
½-1 teaspoon salt
olive oil

Garnish ideas: lime, shredded cabbage, dried Mexican oregano, crushed red pepper, cilantro, onion, queso fresco, radishes, etc. Don’t forget the buttered and toasted bread.

In a large pot or dutch oven, bring water to a boil and add the rest of the ingredients except for the olive oil. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, for about 1 and half to 2 hours, or until the hominy is cooked. Add more water and salt if necessary. At the end, add a drizzle of olive oil and stir. This will add a bit of greasy richness that the soup is missing from lack of meat.

pozole

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